Tag Archives: Work

69% of US wage earners comprise just 30% of cumulative net compensation

The bar-line chart below examines the cumulative number of US wage earners in different net compensation brackets and their contribution to the cumulative net compensation in 2017. In addition, a data row is used to detail the average net compensation and percent of wage earners for every bracket.

At the highest differential, 69% of wage earners comprise just 30% of cumulative net compensation. Note that at about 95% of wage earners, there is a discontinuity due a significant change in bracket definition.

Bar-line chart examining wage earners and their net compensation

Bar-line chart showing cumulative number of US wage earners and their cumulative net compensation across different net compensation brackets in 2017

The data visualization above was built with the Aploris add-in for PowerPoint.

 

100% stacked bar chart showing how Americans spend their average weekday and weekend

The 100% stacked bar charts below explain how Americans spend their average weekday and weekend. The chart includes two data columns that detail the percent of Americans that participate in each of the activities.

As expected, Americans spend less time working and more time on personal care (including sleeping) and leisure/sports on weekends. However, 24% of Americans spend some time working on weekends.

This chart was built using a Apple MacBook Pro with Aploris for Mac and Office 2016 for Mac.  The data column is a standard feature with Aploris and does not require manual editing.

Stacked bar chart showing how Americans spend their day

100% stacked bar chart explaining how Americans spend their average weekdays and weekends

Cluster bar chart comparing calories burned for different exercises

The cluster bar chart below compares the calories burned by completing a 30 minute session of different activities. The cluster chart is used to provide two data points for each activity: one for a 125 pound person and one for a 185 pound person. The chart is grouped in 4 segments based on the activity type. The grouping was achieved by increasing the spacing between some columns.

Of all occupational activities, firefighting required the most calories. Not surprisingly, computer work required very few calories.

Calories burned by different exercises

Calories burned doing different activities for 30 minutes

This chart was built with Office 2016 for Mac and the Aploris add-in.

Histogram of number of hours Americans work

The bar chart below represents a histogram of the number of hours Americans work a day. A histogram is a bar chart where the height of each bar is proportional to the frequency of a variable at a certain value. For example, of Americans that worked, 13% worked 8 hours a day and 95% worked 12 hours or less.  The sum of all the frequencies adds up to a 100%.

Bar chart of number of Americans daily work hours

Bar chart histogram of the number of hours Americans work a day

This bar chart/histogram was built using Aploris on a Mac with OS X.

Waterfall chart highlighting top 10 largest employers in the US

The waterfall or cascade chart below shows the number of employees working for the top 10 largest employers in the US. Each segment adds to the next allowing the reader to step through the contribution of each employer. These 10 ten companies represent 5.7M jobs and Walmart alone is 2.2M or 39% of the total.

Waterfall chart highlighting 10 top private employers

Waterfall or cascade chart showing number of employees working at top 10 private employers in the US

This chart was built using Aploris for Mac with PowerPoint 2016.

 

 

 

Bar-line chart comparing length of work week and year for Western European countries

The bar-line chart below compares the length of the work year in working hours (bar) and work week (line) for several Western European countries in 2014. In addition, a data row is used to compare the number of work weeks in a year.

Bar-line chart showing yearly working hours across several Western European countries

Bar-line chart showing yearly working hours across several Western European countries

Germany has a relatively typical work week length but has the short work year and therefore the fewest number of working weeks. The Netherlands have the shortest working week but a number of working weeks above the average.

The bar-line chart allows us to plot two separate but connected values. Two axes are used to take the different dimensions of yearly and weekly hours into account. The axes were set such that the bars and line do not run into each other making therefore the series stand out clearly. This was achieved by setting a specific axis maximum value. We also rotated this chart to help make the country labels easier to read.