What 2,000 Calories Looks Like – NY Times visualization

The stacked bar charts below show what 2000 calories looks like at different popular US restaurants. At Cheesecake Factory and Sonic a single item is over 2000 calories!

Each chart was individually created with a fixed vertical axis to ensure they can be compared across each other. Food and drink are segmented by color.

Stacked chart: What 2000 calories looks like at popular restaurants

Stacked bar charts showing ~2000 calories at popular US restaurants

These charts were built using the Aploris add-in for PowerPoint. Aploris, compatible with Mac and Windows computers, allows users to quickly create insightful business charts including Marimekkos and waterfalls.

18 comments on “What 2,000 Calories Looks Like – NY Times visualization

  1. Brad

    Ok, but how much are you eating? I see the items, but not their quantity. I could probably eat 2000 calories of beef Stir Fry, chicken wings or turkey chili if it’s really good. Is that shake at Burger King large, medium, or small? X-Large?

    Reply
      1. not bob

        they are probably too tired and confused from the Standard American Diet to realize that. very nice of you to help them 🙂

      2. Joe

        Only a kid would order a small. This comparison chart is misleading for a lot of ignorant people. Myself included..

    1. Patrick Jayel

      This is exactly what I was thinking. Starbucks for example; personally, I have no reason or desire to order THREE drinks and TWO sandwiches for myself alone. Whether or not these calorie counts are accurate, you might have some sort of eating disorder if youre ordering all of that for one person in one sitting. Same goes for Pizza Hut. A 12oz Mountain Dew is 170 calories. To consume 440 calories in a sitting, as the charts seem to state, one would have to drink roughly 30oz of Mt Dew. I just cant put any faith in these calorie counts as long as serving sizes aren’t specified.

      Reply
      1. At

        I think its more to show how much each thing really counts for instead of saying its a typical meal

  2. Jay

    The at home foods are ridiculously off. Why over dramatisize when the facts alone could had been scary. The beer field for at home was so small it did not have a marker. This is assuming that they are drinking a specifically low calorie beer at one beer, but the same person gets all these milkshakes at half the restaraunts.

    Reply
  3. Susan

    I would like to see charts like these but with the healthiest available menu choice at each restaurant instead of the worst.

    Reply
    1. Kelly

      Check out the “Eat This, Not That!” books, they profile the best and worst options at chain restaurants across the country.

      Reply

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